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12/24/2018

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Yes -- thank God for the lights. And the “mute” button. :)

Merry Christmas, all!

Merry Christmas to you and to all.

I have been thinking a lot lately about how in my youth the sacred and secular aspects of Christmas were intertwined somehow. The secular did not seem to compete somehow. Maybe just because I was young.

This has been a great Advent. Because no one was rushing off to work in the morning, we were good about lighting the Advent Wreath and praying, and writing a little something everyday has helped. And just not going out much or watching commercial TV has been great. I don't even know what the toys that everyone has to have are.

AMDG

I do love the lights. I think when people put up lights, they are putting up symbols of Jesus even though they don't know it. ;-)

Once I almost killed my children and myself when I took them out to look at lights. I really don't know how we didn't have a wreck. I was distracted and ran a light and was about to T-bone a truck. It was right in front of me, and then it was gone. It may have been a miracle. I don't know
It was like I drove through the truck.

AMDG

Too bad there's no video.

"I think when people put up lights, they are putting up symbols of Jesus even though they don't know it."

Yeah, that's along the lines of what I was thinking in this post.

If you start noticing it, the sacred and secular holiday distinction is very apparent going back at least as far as the '50s. But it didn't seem as sharp as it does now, and I think one reason is that they weren't necessarily seen as being completely in opposition, I mean in a hostile, one-of-us-must-win kind of way. Secular songs would still use the word "Christmas," as in that chestnuts-roasting song. There wasn't as much of that squeamish avoidance even of the word "Christmas."

Mention of your writing every day reminds that I had meant to put a link to your Advent posts in this post. A bit late but here it is:

http://thethreeprayers.blogspot.com/search/label/Advent%202018

Merry Christmas, y’all! We have moved back to Australia and organisationally speaking, we’re pretty stressed, but otherwise happy to be home.

Merry Christmas to you, too. Didn't know y'all were going back, though now that I think of it I believe you did mention that you were. Anyway, glad to hear that you're glad to be there. :-) Not just Australia but Taz, I hope? Such a beautiful place.

Yes, back to Tasmania.

It is very beautiful :)

We have been talking about how the new holiday music isn't even decent music. It's just a formulaic drivel that seems like a desperate attempt to manufacture celebratory feelings. So, sitting in the choir during midnight Mass and thinking about the carols and hymns we were singing, I realized that anyone who wants to belittle Christianity can't possibly let people listen to both kinds of music side-by-side. It would just emphasize the bankrupt-ness of the holiday music and the depth of the the traditional music.

AMDG

For a lot of people, yes. Others would prefer the drivel. Speaking of which: I don't have occasion to hear the music very much, but the other night we looked on Netflix to see if there were any interesting-looking Christmas movies that we didn't know about. Judging by the titles and descriptions, it was all drivel.

"If you start noticing it, the sacred and secular holiday distinction is very apparent going back at least as far as the '50s. But it didn't seem as sharp as it does now, and I think one reason is that they weren't necessarily seen as being completely in opposition"

I'm sure I mentioned this in some previous year, but this comes to mind when listening to Christmas records from the 50's and early 60's. Secular songs were juxtaposed with pious renditions of traditional hymns and carols, but it never seemed jarring. You got the sense that the artists/arrangers knew where to draw the stylistic lines, and that both the spiritual and the popular aspects of the holiday were being celebrated in their own way.

Nowadays the new stuff just all seems to blur together. And most of it is just horrible.

And many of the secular songs were well-written--now, not so much.

AMDG

Sinatra's Jolly Christmas album is a perfect example: secular on side 1, sacred on side 2, all beautifully and appropriately arranged and performed.

We got a card from relatives that simply said, "Merry." No Christmas.

On a different note, compare John Lennon's Christmas Song and Paul McCartney's.

Oh, and I hate that "It's cold outside" song.

I used to hear "Have a merry" from some people, delivered in a very jaded tone.

I don't care much for either Lennon's or McCartney's, but they are certainly different.

And by the way it's nice to hear from you again, Robert.

"Oh, and I hate that 'It's cold outside' song."

I don't like it either, but I hate "Santa Baby" a lot more. Positively cringe-inducing.

"Santa Baby" is one of those that I will instantly try to turn off or escape.

I hate both of those.

AMDG

Couldn't find the thread where we last talked about TV shows but I wanted to say that I just finished series two of 'The Missing' and it's excellent--even better than the first series, imo. While there are a few minor references to series 1 in series 2, the two seasons are more-or-less stand-alones.

I didn't remember you mentioning that but I see that it was a year ago almost to the day.

https://www.lightondarkwater.com/2017/01/sunday-night-journal-january-8-2017.html

I see also that it's on Amazon, free with Prime. And that Keeley Hawes is in it. I like her a lot.

Wow -- hard to believe it was a year ago. For the record Missing 2 doesn't have the "child in peril" aspect that the first series did. This one is about a missing girl who escapes and returns home 11 years after her abduction, which opens questions about who took her and why.

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